Canon SED TV can proceed as Applied Nanotech will not appeal

SED TV

Applied Nanotech announced today that they will not appeal the court decision that ruled against them and for Canon in July of this year. That decision (click here for pdf copy) cleared the way for Canon to use the Nano-Proprietary (Applied Nanotech) SED technology for Canon SED TVs.

“Nasdaq-listed Applied Nanotech, which had sued the Japanese company for illegally sublicensing its patents, told the Financial Times that it had decided not to appeal to the US Supreme Court. “It would probably be a futile effort,” said Douglas Baker, Applied Nanotech’s chief financial officer.”

However, Canon President Tsuneji Uchida told the Financial Times that due to the current economic situation “new display products are not introduced much because people would laugh at them.”

The promise of SED TV has so far been unfulfilled. Despite rave reviews from all who were able to view the SED TV at various trade shows, the legal difficulties with Nano kept the set from further development and ultimately, the consumer market.

With OLED TV and FED TV fast approaching the consumer electronics market, it remains to be seen if SED TV can overcome the last few years of enforced isolation from the market.

However, as one of this blog’s readers is so persistent in pointing out, and rightfully so, neither OLED or FED TV manufacturers have displayed anything approaching the screen sizes that Canon has with SED TV. The much publicized difficulties with manufacturing large sized OLED displays have yet to be overcome. FED displays will only be available in a 32″ size as broadcast monitors starting in 2009.

Can or will Canon show up at CES 2009 with the SED TV? I, like many others, was very disappointed two years ago when they pulled out of CES 2007 at literally the last minute. I cancelled my trip and hoped to see the SED TV in 2008. That didn’t happen and we’ll know shortly whether the Canon (SED Inc) SED TV will be on display in Las Vega in January.

With information from www.ft.com Check out the full story there.

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19 thoughts on “Canon SED TV can proceed as Applied Nanotech will not appeal”

  1. Some mistenly think ANI lost the appeal. The Breach Of Contract was upheld. Toshiba was an illegal subsidiary. The Appeals court gave Canon the licence back bcause the contract stated “irrevocable”. So … in my opinion Canon will be able to produce cost competitive SED TVs with new printing technology within a year. BUT Canon can not sub-license. They need critical mass , plus have to placate Toshiba. Canon has a license. Is there a new agreement allowing them to sub-license. Don’t know but I guess yes.

  2. IMHO – IP arguments like this hurt the technology perhaps beyond repair. IMHO, the two should have worked together to resolve this rather than taking two years in the courts. Perhaps Canon will make the technology available to the consumer and perhaps not – especially if they are really afraid of being laughed at (that, in and of itself, is laughable and sad – IMHO). I, for one, would consider an SED display if it were to hit the market. With technological advancements in the not too distant future, I’m waiting. SED would be on my list of things to consider if it comes to the marketplace.

  3. HERE COMES WENDY AGAIN, SPROUTING OFF ABOUT
    SED, IF YOU GO TO CANONS WEBSITE, THEY TELL
    YOU THAT SED IS A CORE TECHNOLOGY AND THAT
    THEY ARE NOW ABLE TO PRODUCE SED AT COMPARABLE COST TO LCD, ALL CANON ARE WAITING ON ARE THE RIGHT MARKET CONDITIONS
    FOR THE LAUNCH, WHICH MAY COME THROUGH CES2009, GO AND DO SOME REAL RESEARCH WENDY

  4. JUST AN ADDITIONAL COMMENT ON SED PRICING
    AS OPPOSED TO LCD AND PLASMA, I WOULD QUITE HAPPILY PAY UP TO 500 OR MORE DOLLARS FOR
    SED OVER AN EQUIVALENT SIZED PLASMA OR LCD
    WHY? THINK ABOUT IT, THE ADDITIONAL COST SPREAD OVER THE LIFE OF THE SET, KNOWING
    YOU HAVE THE VERY BEST IN PICTURE QUALITY
    COUPLED WITH A LOWER OPERATING COST, IS
    ALL THE INCENTIVE I NEED, THAT ADDITIONAL COST IS EQUIVALENT TO FORGOING A COFFEE
    A DAY FOR 12 MONTHS, A VERY SMALL PRICE TO PAY FOR SED, CANON MUST REALIZE THAT THE
    MARKET OUT THERE FOR SED IN TV STATIONS WORLD WIDE IS ENORMOUS, THAT MARKET ALONE
    IS WORTH MILLIONS!!

  5. Too little too late. If canon shoots out a 46″ awsome full HD SED tomorrow for $2500, I’m buying. If not, it’s too little too late, with LCD vastly improving, plasma coming down in price, FED on the verge of mass production and OLED making strides that point to a brilliant future for the technology.

    SED was fine two years ago. Now they’ll only barely be able to survive if they both, do better than 2009’s LCD’s and at a similar price point.

    Most 2009 LCD’s are going to be of more than enough quality for the average joe, so SED only stands a chance if it’s VASTLY (and not just a little) superior and not so much more expensive.

  6. What ever you do don’t piss off Zvi Yanin, because then he will sell patents and get taken to school.

  7. You must understand by now that much of the quality of a set comes from the electronics and not just the screen material.

    LCD currently has a cost advantage over Plasma due to the nature of how the technology works.

    Top end Plasmas stomp top end LCD’s but at what cost and where is the divide.

    SED is going to offer a very similar picture to that of Plasma but with a much less expensive manufacturing process.

    The Primary reason these sets will launch at a price premium isn’t so much the picture quality of the set as much as it is the investment cost recovery. The first sets out will also likely contain higher end scalars and imaging electronics to set a build quality standard, no one wants a first generation technology to show problems with high failure rates.

    Because of this and the timeless delays, I gave up on SED as a television and went with a high-end plasma.

    I still have an interest in SED as it should be capable of offering higher resolutions in smaller screen sizes and will hopefully one day be offered as a high resolution computer display. i.e. 2560×1600 packed in less then 30 inches, something that plasma cannot currently do.

    Several years from now I wonder if SED is going to be considered the “cheap” display.

  8. NON BELIEVER BETTER GET OUT AND DO SOME RESEARCH ON THE DISPLAYS COMMENTED ON, HE
    HAS NO IDEA, AS HAVE MOST OF THE CONTRIBUTORS TO THIS WEBSITE, A RECENT FULL TECHNICAL TEST ON THE LATEST LED BACK LIGHT
    LCD’S FROM SONY AND SAMSUNG WERE A TOTAL REVELATION ON THE POOR OFF AXIS PERFORMANCE
    THIS TECHNOLOGY GIVES, WHILE PLASMA STRUGGLE
    VALIANTLY TO BRING THE POWER USE DOWN TO CURRENT LCD LEVELS, WHICH IN THEMSELVES ARE
    WAY ABOVE SED, THATS ENOUGH INFO FOR NOW
    SEE IF THAT CAN BE ABSORBED

  9. The new generation of plasma TV’s coming out next year use a new technology that will improve picture quality and cut energy consumption by 50%, which should make them more efficient than current LCD’s. It will be introduced by Panasonic first then followed by Pioneer. If interested to learn more, Google Neo PDP.

  10. Will Sed or Fed offer a better picture quality for standar TV broadcast? (non-HD). That’s what i’m looking for, i don’t care about Blue Ray since i mostly watch TV. I don’t like LCD or PLasma due to the awful picture quality (although they are outstanding with HD).

  11. Pelele, for standard TV broadcast, actually old cathode ray screens offer the best image quality because of the way the images are brought to the screen (interlaced half-images every 1/25th or 1/30th second, analogue broadcast signal with analogue noise, analogue image information).

    I think SED will be very similar to LCD and Plasma, when it comes to video/image material, because all these systems work also physically on a strict “per pixel” basis whereas cathode ray tubes just scan down the whole screen in a rather analogue fashion (although it has a fixed resolution, the “pixels” tend to blend into each other creating a softer image)

    So a LCD or Plasma or SED won’t actually increase the quality of standard TV broadcast, just it’s size. But it is the better choice for HD or other digital TV material.

  12. “Image quality of SD” often confuses people.

    It’s not so much that SD “looks worse” on a High definition set, so much as it is that HD sets are so much more true to the source, that you see all the flaws in the source that the older sets smudged and smeared and packed into a typically smaller screen area.

    An example of this would be to watch an SD broadcast on a high quality HD set, then purposely blur your eyes.

    Many people will perceive the picture to be of higher quality when doing this!!!

    This is because when you purposely blur the picture using your eyes, artifacts will smear away, and your brain will try to “fill in” the missing detail.

    HD being 6X higher resolution then SD also means that for SD to look clear, you would need to watch it on a screen 6X smaller, or stand that much further away from it. (20″ is 4X smaller then 40″)

    If your one of the people that thinks SD looks worse on an HD set, try viewing it in PIP or split screen. This is obviously going to reduce the resolution of the picture, effectively reducing the quality of the image, but many of the people that think SD looks bad on HD will believe the picture quality improved doing this!

    Another easy thing to do would be to take a high resolution (e.g. 10MP) digital camera picture, and view it at 100%, then zoom it back to 50% or 25% and compare how “sharp” the image appears.

    The lower the resolution, the sharper its going to look even though that sounds counter intuitive.

    And that is why so many people complain that SD looks bad on HD. (well that, and because many HD sets are of poor quality)

    One last note: CRT (a Phosphor based display) is the standard on which material is and has been calibrated.

    Plasma and SED are both Phosphor based displays unlike LCD.

    That fact alone is going to typically allow CRT, Plasma, and SED to offer better color accuracy.

  13. i wonder if the sed or fed TV’s have that familiar hum like all crts have thats one thing i miss when watching a lcd tv

  14. “One potentially lucrative new business is television sets. Uchida confirms that Canon is working on television sets based on surface-conduction electron-emitter displays (SED), a rival technology to organic light-emitting diodes, or OLEDs, a system backed by Sony and Samsung. Canon sees these cost-competitive displays, which could jolt the huge TV and monitor markets, as a logical complement to its cameras and copiers. Having trumpeted SED prototypes in 2006, Canon was recently cleared to launch SED television sets after winning a patent lawsuit that has delayed progress for more than three years. Nevertheless, Uchida suggests that Canon will not launch SED immediately because of the fall in television prices that has anguished Sony and Panasonic”

    http://cnbceb.com/technology-telecoms/can-canon/867/

  15. Look forward to SED and other future technologies but they will have to pry my Hitachi rear projection (crt) 51S500 from my cold dead hands. It destroys my friends new Sony Flagship (smoothness, non digital glare, film like image, contrast, colours, and oh yeah, INK BLACKS! I have not compared it to a Kuro however. Probably not much different apart from some added resolution which is a non issue from 10 ft back anyhow. My TV is a bugger to move though if you need to relocate (109 kilograms).

  16. I used to own a CRT Projection myself. When I moved to the Kuro, I liked what I saw, but it wasn’t until I watched the old CRT again that I realized how giant a leap forward the Kuro was.

    The main problems with CRT Projection are the sharpness, over-scan, and while the blacks do get black, they only do so when the entire image is dark, bright scenes bloom light everywhere, and tend to have a washed out look to them.

    Text looks really muddy in comparison, making the term “film like” very accurate. All in all, I was happy with my CRT, and much happier with the Kuro.

    If your looking to make the leep, you won’t be disappointed.

    ——–

    Sure hasn’t been much news on the SED front. OLED while being extremely expensive right now, looks like it may be able to be manufactured at costs even lower then that of SED in time. I can’t imagine Plasma being able to compete price wise if production ever ramps up on either of these technologies.

  17. Andy,

    While CRT projection does suffer from a degree of lense flare now and then, I have not found that the image becomes unacceptably washed out with the presence of light during light scenes (my interior is treated with black cloth material to minimize reflections however).

    However, it the new Kuro concept shows that we have finally achieved absolute black and is an entirely new breed. A significant step up even from existing Kuro models. Finally they have caught up to the CRT front projectors in terms of blacks. This can’t be good for SED.

    http://gizmodo.com/341434/battlemodo-pioneer-super+black-kuro-concept-duels-best-tv-ever-and-wins

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